The New U.S. Tax Deadlines for 2020 (COVID-19)

By Janet Berry-Johnson, CPA on April 17, 2020

The normal April 15 tax deadline has come and gone. Instead of a flurry of activity, taxpayers and tax preparers have more time to file, pay, and extend their returns this year, thanks to the Treasury Department’s decision to extend the federal tax deadline.

Here’s a summary of what the new tax deadline means for different tax payments.

Federal income taxes for 2019 returns

If you owe money for 2019, you now have until July 15, 2020, to pay what you owe. You don’t need to file an extension or call the IRS. You will not be charged any penalties or interest on the balance due, as long as you pay the tax due by July 15. Interest and penalties will begin to accrue after that date.

The new deadline applies to all taxpayers who normally file federal income tax returns on April 15, including individuals, trusts and estates, and corporations. It doesn’t impact partnership, LLC and S corporation tax returns that were due on March 15, 2020.

If you need more time to file your return, you can request an extension. That will give you until October 15, 2020, to file your tax return. However, you still need to pay any tax due by July 15, or face penalties and interest.

Self-employment taxes for 2019 returns

The automatic extension also applies to people who pay self-employment taxes. The new deadline to file Schedule SE and pay the balance of 2019 self-employment taxes is now July 15.

State income taxes for 2019 returns

It’s important to note that your state tax filing or payment deadlines may be different. Some states extended the deadline for state income tax returns to match the new federal deadline. Others have different filing or payment deadlines.

Here’s a summary of the extended due dates by state.

State Tax Filing Deadline Tax Payment Deadline Penalties & Interest Charged After
Alabama July 15 July 15 July 15
Alaska* N/A N/A N/A
Arizona July 15 July 15 July 15
Arkansas July 15 July 15 July 15
California July 15 July 15 July 15
Colorado October 15 July 15 July 15
Connecticut July 15 July 15 July 15
Delaware July 15 July 15 July 15
District of Columbia July 15 July 15 July 15
Florida* N/A N/A N/A
Georgia July 15 July 15 July 15
Hawaii July 20 July 20 July 20
Idaho June 15 June 15 June 15
Illinois July 15 July 15 July 15
Indiana July 15 July 15 July 15
Iowa July 31 July 31 July 31
Kansas July 15 July 15 July 15
Kentucky** July 15 July 15 **
Louisiana July 15 July 15 July 15
Maine July 15 July 15 July 15
Maryland July 15 July 15 July 15
Massachusetts July 15 July 15 July 15
Michigan July 15 July 15 July 15
Minnesota July 15 July 15 July 15
Mississippi May 15 May 15 May 15
Missouri July 15 July 15 July 15
Montana July 15 July 15 July 15
Nebraska July 15 July 15 July 15
Nevada* N/A N/A N/A
New Hampshire* N/A N/A N/A
New Jersey July 15 July 15 July 15
New Mexico July 15 July 15 July 15
New York July 15 July 15 July 15
North Carolina** July 15 July 15 **
North Dakota July 15 July 15 July 15
Ohio July 15 July 15 July 15
Oklahoma July 15 July 15 July 15
Oregon July 15 July 15 July 15
Pennsylvania July 15 July 15 July 15
Rhode Island July 15 July 15 July 15
South Carolina July 15 July 15 July 15
South Dakota* N/A N/A N/A
Tennessee*** June 15/July 15 June 15/July 15 June 15/July 15
Texas N/A N/A N/A
Utah July 15 July 15 July 15
Vermont July 15 July 15 July 15
Virginia** May 1 June 1 **
Washington* N/A N/A N/A
West Virginia July 15 July 15 July 15
Wisconsin July 15 July 15 July 15
Wyoming* N/A N/A N/A
  • Alaska, Florida, Nevada, New Hampshire, Texas, and Wyoming do not have a state income tax.

** Kentucky, North Carolina, and Virginia will waive late payment penalties. However, interest still applies to payments made after the tax filing deadline, as state law prohibits a waiver of interest. Virginia’s Governor submitted a budget amendment to waive interest on income tax payments, which has yet to be approved by the state’s General Assembly.

*** Tennessee has extended the deadline for business tax returns to June 15. Tennessee does not have a state income tax, but it does have a “Hall tax” on interest and dividend income. The deadline for Franchise, Excise, and Hall tax returns has been extended to July 15.

Estimated tax payments for 2020

Estimated federal income and self-employment tax payments for the first and second quarter of 2020 would normally be due on April 15 and June 15. The due date for those estimated payments has also been extended to July 15, 2020.

Third and fourth quarter instalments are still due on their usual dates of September 15, 2020, and January 15, 2021.

If you’ve already scheduled estimated payments, you may be able to reschedule them, depending on your payment method.

  • IRS Direct Pay. If you scheduled payment through IRS Direct Pay, use the confirmation number provided when you scheduled the payment to access the Look Up Payment feature. You can modify or cancel a scheduled payment until two business days before the payment date.

  • Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS). If you scheduled payment through the EFTPS system, click on Payments on the EFTPS home page, log in, and click Cancel a Tax Payment. Then follow the instructions on the screen. You must cancel the payment at least two days before the scheduled payment date.

  • Electronic Funds Withdrawal. If you scheduled payment as part of your tax return filing by authorizing an electronic funds withdrawal, you must call the IRS e-file Payment Services at 888-353-4537. You must cancel the payment before 11:59 p.m. ET, two business days prior to the scheduled payment date.

  • Credit or Debit Card. If you scheduled payment by credit or debit card, contact the card processor to cancel the payment.

For state tax payments, check with your state’s department of revenue to find out how to cancel or modify scheduled payments.

Calculate your estimated quarterly taxes (for free)

Follow our step-by-step estimated quarterly tax calculator to figure out how much you owe.

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This post is to be used for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal, business, or tax advice. Each person should consult his or her own attorney, business advisor, or tax advisor with respect to matters referenced in this post. Bench assumes no liability for actions taken in reliance upon the information contained herein.

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